Teen Motor Vehicle Crashes: How big is the problem?

March 6, 2015

In 2011, about 2,650 teens in the United States aged 16-19 were killed and almost 292,000 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor-vehicle crashes. That means that seven teens ages 16 to 19 died every day from vehicle injuries.

Young people ages 15-25 represent only 14% of the U.S. population. However, they account for 30% ($19 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among males and 28% ($7 billion) of the total costs of  motor vehicle injuries among females.

(Source: http://www.cdc.gov)

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National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW)

November 26, 2013

The next National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) takes place on October 19-25, 2014. This year’s theme was ‘It Takes Two: Shared Expectations for Teens and Parents for Driving,’ and thousands of teens across the country used the NTDSW platform to reinforce this safety theme at their schools, in their communities and with their families.

National Teen Driver Safety Week is a time designated by Congress each year to raise awareness of teen driver safety topics and to encourage safe teen driver and passenger behavior.

Below is a list of the top ten things that we need to know about teen drivers, according to the National Safety Council.

  1. Care crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S.
  2. Most dangerous time of a teen driver’s life is the first 12 months after receiving a license.
  3. A teen driver’s crash risk is three times that of drivers ages 20 and older.
  4. Teens crash most often because they are inexperienced – not because they take more risks behind the wheel.
  5. Teen passengers are one of the biggest distractions for teen drivers. Just one teen passenger raises a teen driver’s fatal crash risk 44 percent. Two passengers doubles fatal crash risk. Three or more quadruples crash risk.
  6. Most fatal nighttime crashes involving teen drivers happen between 9PM and midnight
  7. More than half of teens killed in car crashes were not restrained by a seatbelt.
  8. Most states’ teen driving laws and restrictions do not adequately protect teen drivers from the most serious crash risks.
  9. Teens really do learn to drive from watching their parents. A survey from the Allstate Foundation found 80 percent of teens cite their parents as having the most influence over teen’s driving habits.
  10. Crash risk remains high after licensure. In fact, young drivers’ crash risk does not significantly begin decreasing until age 25.

Tips on Shopping for an Online Traffic School

June 7, 2013

Be sure to read the fine print when shopping for a traffic school such as Basic Driver Improvement, Advanced Driver Improvement or the D.A.T.E. Course (learner’s permit course). If the cost of the course is unusually low, most of the time there is a hidden fee attached and you’ll end up paying a lot more than the fee that is advertised. For instance, some of the course providers may advertise the D.A.T.E. Course for as low as *$19. Seems like a great price to pay, but WAIT! The very small (*) in front of the price often means “LOOK FOR THE HIDDEN FEE”. The hidden fee is usually an extra charge that is in small print somewhere on the webpage indicating additional charges for a certificate or state processing fee, which can be anywhere from $8-$15 in addition to the listed price of $19. That low advertised fee is now $27-$35, way above the average cost of the course. It is also important to know that it is not necessary to purchase a completion certificate for the D.A.T.E. Course, all course providers are required to submit the completion electronically and the DMV will not accept a paper certificate.

Bridgeway Center, Inc. Driving Schools offers online courses such as Basic Driver Improvement, Advanced Driver Improvement and D.A.T.E. with no hidden fees.


May is Global Youth Traffic Safety Month

May 2, 2013

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, more than 5,000 teens are killed in passenger vehicle crashes a year. Lack of driving experience, feelings of invincibility and distractions like teen passengers and cell phones, it is easy to understand how young drivers can be a threat to themselves and everyone else on the road. Global Youth Traffic Safety Month is a great opportunity to teach young drivers of situations that could be potentially dangerous.

Bridgeway Center, Inc. Driving Schools offers a variety of courses designed for young drivers including Drug Alcohol Traffic Education (DATE), A+ Driving Lessons, Safe New Attitude Program (SNAP), and a Distracted Driver course.